DeafBiographies.com

Ohio School for the Deaf History


Home

Facts

Search

Contents

Pictures

Schools

Sign Up Now
Login
 

Patterson, Robert. "History of the Ohio Institution for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb." In Histories of American Schools for the Deaf, 1817-1893. Edward Allen Fay, ed. 3 volumes Washington, DC: Volta Bureau, 1893.

Page 27

At the same time that the boarding department passed into the hand of the Principal, a Matron was appointed to "take charge of the female pupils out of school, for the purpose of forming their moral and economical habits while they are receiving mental improvement." The growth of the Institution necessitated the appointment of an Assistant Matron in 1846, and another one was added in 1864. In 1868, the positions of Housekeeper and Nurse were established. Since 1875 two nurses, one for the boys and the girls respectively, have been in charge of the hospitals. In 1869, a dressmaker was appointed, to be under the direction of the Matron. In 1892, an act was passed by the Legislature, directing the dressmaker to give instruction in fitting and cutting.

In 1841, a Physician was placed upon the list of officers.

In 1851, a Visitors' Attendant was appointed "much to the relief of the matrons, who found the service not a burdensome addition to their other labors, but they were often obliged to neglect their other important duties, especially the proper care and supervision of the female pupils and the preparation of their work." It was found necessary in 1868 to have a doorkeeper to receive the visitors and wait upon them. This position was dropped in 1873 when an additional attendant was appointed. The two attendants take turns in conducting the visitors through the building and attending to the calls of the telephone.

In 1868, a Supervisor for the boys was appointed and the next year two boys' attendants were placed in charge of the dormitories. In the assignment of monitorial duties, the appointment of an additional attendant became necessary. Since 1880 a lady has attended to the personal cleanliness of the small boys. A night watch was appointed in 1869, and also the laundry was placed in charge of a man.

Industrial Department

The Board was early impressed with the importance of industrial training. The report for 1836 says: "Of the original plan of the Institution, however, one part, and that a very important part, yet remains to be acted upon in a way that will be adequate to the advantages which it proposes. This is the instruction of the pupils, the males especially, is those trades which may be suitable to their circumstances, and which will enable them to

Previous page Next page
   
   

Questions? Comments? Contact us!
amy@deafbiographies.com

© 2003-2007 DeafBiographies.com

This site last updated 5 January 2007.